FERMENTAS: BOOSTING GROWTH THROUGH SMART SPECIALISATION

PHILIPPA DAWSON1, KIM SEAGRAM 1, TOM LEWIS1

1Fermentation Tasmania Ltd.

ceo@fermentasmania.com

 

ABSTRACT

Fermentas is a newly formalised industry cluster, tasked by Food Innovation Australia Ltd to drive industry growth by applying a smart specialisation focus to the skilled production of high-quality fermented food, drink and other products. The Fermentas concept is a world first in terms of exploring the potential of fermentation as a value-add to a region.  Fermentas has been established to provide an inspirational physical and intellectual environment to facilitate the development and growth of globally-recognised and world-class businesses. Tasmania’s unique offerings, collaborative entrepreneurs, world-class primary produce, environmental assets and ‘islandness’ provide a unique moment in which to develop a focussed ‘triple helix’ partnership between industry, university and government – adding value through the targeted pooling of resources. By explicitly supporting and promoting collaboration between fermenting enterprises, allied industries, trainers, educators, researchers and government agencies – regionally, nationally and internationally – Fermentas is championing increased innovation, productivity and competitiveness: not by producing more, but by producing differently.


BIOGRAPHY

Philippa Dawson is the Chief Executive Officer of FermenTasmania Ltd, an industry-led, not-for-profit industry cluster established to accelerate innovation, growth and collaboration for fermentation-based enterprises. FermenTasmania sees a Tasmania transformed into an internationally recognised centre of excellence for the design, production and marketing of fine fermented food, drinks and other products, and through this, return substantial benefits across the economy. Philippa has over 20 years of experience in strategic policy development, service delivery and corporate management. Previously, Philippa was Chief Operating Officer at the Australian Trade and Investment Commission (Austrade) responsible for managing the organisation’s finance, human resources, I.T. property, security, consular and legal teams.From 2014 – 2017 Philippa was General Manager for Trade at Austrade, responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for Australia’s trade promotion strategies to connect export-ready Australian businesses to overseas opportunities and work with them to achieve commercial outcomes; promote Australian capability internationally and, to work with priority industry sectors to drive sustained long-term growth of Australian exports. Prior to joining Austrade, Philippa held senior roles across Federal Government including in both the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.Philippa has served overseas in Washington DC and short-term assignments in Barbados, Toronto and with the United Nations in Italy.Philippa has a Bachelor of Economics (majoring in Japanese), Graduate Diplomas in Foreign Affairs and Trade and Public Administration and a Masters Degree in Marketing Communication.

CHOOSING BETWEEN AGRICULTURAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE FREE STATE PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA: A MULTIPLE CRITERIA ANALYSIS

Johannes van der Merwe1 and D.C SPIES1

1School for Environmental Management and science, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Corresponding author: Johannes D van der Merwe, Johnny.vandermerwe@nwu.ac.za

 

ABSTRACT

Since the abolishment of Apartheid after 1994, one of the major sectors earmarked by the South African government to correct the injustices of the past, to improve inclusion, job creation and food security is the Agricultural sector.  Various land reform programmes was initiated but the success rate was very low due to various reasons. One initiative was to create “master plans” for agricultural development on a provincial basis. These plans includes the identification and selection of possible agricultural production enterprises for implementation. A total of 13 possible enterprises was identified in the Free State province and a multiple criteria approach was used to rank the best fitting combination of enterprises given the specified goals/criteria. The results show that extensive beef and sheep production and intensive vegetable production is the enterprises that is most likely to improve the success of agricultural development, and by doing so, improve the welfare of the province


BIOGRAPHY

Dr van der Merwe did his pre graduate degree at the University of the Free State, after which he concluded his honours and master degrees in Agricultural Economics. He obtained his PhD in Agricultural Economics at the North-West University in 2015 and is currently focussing his research on the competitiveness, sustainability and development of the South African agricultural industry. He is also lecturing in the field of Agricultural Management and Planning as well as Agri-Business Management.

CARBON NEUTRAL BRAZILIAN BEEF: AN ANALYSIS OF ITS ECONOMIC VIABILITY FOR LIVESTOCK SUSTAINABLE INTENSIFICATION

Mariana de Aragão Pereira1; Roberto Giolo de Almeida 1; Valdemir Antonio Laura 1; Fernando Paim Costa 1; Fabiana Villa Alves 1

1Researchers at Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa Gado de Corte).

mariana.pereira@embrapa.br

 

ABSTRACT

This study analyses the economic viability of Carbon Neutral Brazilian Beef (CNBB), proposed by EMBRAPA, as an alternative for sustainable intensification of beef farming in Brazil. A 12-year cash flow was built for two integrated crop-livestock-forestry systems (ICLF) in the Cerrado region, following the guidelines of CNBB protocol. Both included soybean and cattle, but ICLF1 had 227 eucalyptus trees/ha while ICLF2 had 357 eucalyptus trees/ha. Investment analysis showed both systems were economically viable, with ICLF1, with less trees, performing better than ICLF2. Two scenarios under CNBB protocol, considering premium beef prices and costs assumed either by farmers or by the meat processing companies, indicate CNBB can add value to beef production and generate additional income, while contributing to the environment and to animal welfare. Further analyses must follow, to set the guidelines for additional development of the CNBB market.


BIOGRAPHY

Graduated in Animal Science in 1999 and completed her master’s degree in Applied Economics in 2001 both at Viçosa Federal University/ Brazil. In 2011, she completed a PhD on Agricultural Management at Lincoln University, New Zealand. She is a researcher “A” from the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation – EMBRAPA since 2001, initially working at the Strategic Management Secretary (SGE) and, from 2004, working at Embvrapa Beef Cattle research unit. She worked as a research assistent at the Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit (AERU), Lincoln University from 2007 to 2008. She has experience on Rural Economics and Sociology and Farm Management, with emphasis on beef cattle systems and production costs, farm management, technology adoption, human resources management and production chain of bovine leather and meat. She is a member of the Internal Technical Committee of Embrapa Beef Cattle, is an ad hoc reviewer for several Brazilian and international journals and is a technical consultant for state funding agencies and Embrapa project submission systems.

POSITIONING NEW ZEALAND’S PRIMARY INDUSTRY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OPPORTUNITIES PRESENTED BY NEW AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF FOOD PRODUCTS

Stephen Macaulay

Chief Executive Officer, New Zealand Institute of Primary Industry Management

stephen@nzipim.co.nz

 

ABSTRACT

The sheer scale of technology developments in the agricultural and food sectors is moving at a speed we have simply not experienced before. Significant advancements are already being made in the development of plant-based meat and milk alternatives, big data, artificial intelligence, lab cultured food proteins and blockchain technology, to name a few.

We should not underestimate the effect of advanced technology developments occurring in the production and consumption of food proteins, and how these could irrevocably disrupt existing business models that have largely served commodity producers and processors for a long period of time.

Critical to the future success of New Zealand’s agricultural sectors will be our ability to quickly build the capabilities of highly motivated and talented individuals and entrepreneurial organisations in becoming more adept and agile in sensing and exploiting opportunities presented by new technologies and changing consumer preferences in an increasing dynamic market environment.

This paper considers five different approaches that could be used in developing an innovative ecosystem and culture to build and develop the confidence and conviction of individuals in exploring new opportunities for New Zealand’s agri-food and fibre products, or perhaps some other industry we haven’t even thought about yet.

ENTERPRISE SUITABILITY MAPPING: GUIDING AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN TASMANIA, AUSTRALIA

Darren Kidd1, Mathew Webb1,2, Rhys Stickler 1

1Natural Values Conservation, DPIPWE, Prospect, TAS, Australia

2School of Life and Environmental Sciences & Sydney Institute of Agriculture, The University of Sydney, Eveleigh, NSW, Australia

 

ABSTRACT

A series of new irrigation schemes in Tasmania, Australia, along with Tasmanian Government policies, is currently stimulating agricultural growth in the State.  This has been supported through the Tasmanian Government’s ‘Water for Profit’ Program, designed to provide farmers with the tools and knowledge to maximise profits on new irrigation water investments.  The program includes the Department of Primary Industries Parks Water & Environment’s ‘Enterprise Suitability Mapping’, using advanced Digital Soil Mapping, Climate Modelling and Enterprise Suitability Rulesets in consultation with industry to produce high resolution (30m) digital maps of the suitability status of a range of agricultural enterprises.  The maps have been uploaded to a publically accessible internet mapping portal, and give users the capacity to interactively identify the suitability rating, soil and climate parameters and required management at any location in the State.  The maps provide an indication of potential soil vulnerability and relevant management that might be required to ensure agricultural sustainability, along with combined enterprise versatility to show the areas suited to the most crops.  The mapping has achieved a high level of interest in Tasmania, totalling > 143,000 internet mapping visits in the 6 months between April and September 2018.


BIOGRAPHY

Darren Kidd works for the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries Parks Water and Environment (DPIPWE), in the Natural Assets Spatial Intelligence Section, based in Launceston. He began his soil and spatial sciences career with Forestry Tasmania and NSW Agriculture prior to joining DPIPWE to work on soil correlation, condition monitoring, and land degradation mapping. Darren has spent the last several years researching and collaborating with the University of Sydney in Digital Soil Mapping for Tasmanian Enterprise Suitability Assessment and soil vulnerability, and more recently in mapping Soil Security. He is the current Chair of the Digital Soil Assessment Working Group under the National Committee of Soil and Terrain (NCST).

WIND TURBINES IN GERMAN AGRICULTURE – NO RISK, NO GAIN? CURRENT SITUATION AND ECONOMIC VIABILITY

Clemens Fuchs1, Karl Marquardt 1, Joachim Kasten 1 and Katharina Skau 1

1University of Applied Sciences Neubrandenburg, Germany

cfuchs@hs-nb.de

 

ABSTRACT

Only a small number of German farmers invest into wind turbines on the land they own. In contrast to that they tend to rather lease land for that purpose to investors. An explorative qualitative study on the reasons for this investment pattern was conducted.  Calculations of the economic efficiency (e.g. net present value, pay off) of wind turbines build the foundation of the study. In addition, farmers in the North-East Federal State Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania were interviewed for their motives of their capital expenditures. A considerable amount of equity capital is required for setting up a wind turbine. The capital invested frequently competes with the purchase of agricultural land.

Building wind turbines involves risks.  In advance substantial financial means for a planning permission and other examinations precede the construction of a wind turbine. Only in the very end of these costly investigations a construction permit will be issued, facing a farmer with a high level of uncertainty during the whole process.

Fluctuations in wind yield and therefor volatile revenues confront farmers additionally with financial uncertainties. Risk taking behaviour of farmers was assessed normatively by the Hurwicz criterion. Results showed, that only farmers, with the necessary funds at their disposal and a high level of optimism were more likely to take the risk to set up a wind turbine on their land. They take this decision despite the fact that leasing once own land to other investors is of predictable profit and clearly less risky.


BIOGRAPHY

Clemens Fuchs, born 1959 in Ellwangen/Jagst (Germany) and grown up on a farm, studied Agricultural Scienc-es at the University of Stuttgart-Hohenheim and graduated with Diploma (1983) and PhD (1988). He started as a teacher at the Academy for Agriculture in Nürtingen (1987-1989), was a visiting scholar at Michigan State University (1989-1990) and then became a research assistant at the University of Stuttgart-Hohenheim (1990-1995). In 1995 to 1996 he was leader of the project “Restructuring of Large Agricultural Farms in the Region of Vladimir, Russia” and since 1996 professor for Farm Management at the University of Applied Sci-ences in Neubrandenburg. Other activities: Delegated National Expert at the European Commission (2001-2002) and Agricultural Appraiser since 2008. He supports student exchange and research cooperation with universities in Argentina, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation and Ukraine.

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