Ga Yao (add oil), an overview of Hong Kong protests and radicalisation

Totti Karpela1
1Peace Of Mind, Hong Kong

The presentation will give an overview of the events that have taken place in Hong Kong from June 2019 tills January 2020 and provide insight into the change of attitude and mentality within demonstrators. How certain events impacted the overall attitude towards the HK SAR and police response and how different radicalisation elements can be seen in the process. We will look at the impact of social media, age structure of the participants and various push- and pull factors in the radicalisation.


Biography:

Mr. Karpela, a graduate of Finland’s Police University College, has a 20-year career in the National Police of Finland where he worked as a unit supervisor and subject matter expert. During his career, Mr. Karpela was part of a team that specialized in managing threats that were directed towards law enforcement and judicial officials. He also spent nine years as a member of the hostage negotiator team in the National SWAT team. For the majority of his career, Mr. Karpela also worked at the National Police University, teaching management of aggressive behavior and conflict resolution skills.

In his current role in the private sector, Mr. Karpela has worked with presidential candidates, celebrities, media companies, banks and insurance companies, aviation industry, educational facilities as well as multi-national corporations specializing in threat assessment and case management. He provides behavioral and security consultation in numerous global corporations on a weekly basis.

Mr. Karpela has worked as a subject matter expert since 1986, consulting and coaching government organizations and corporations on five continents in the prevention of violent crime, security issues, conflict resolution, and risk mitigation. Mr. Karpela is the only person outside of the United States to hold a CTM-accreditation, professional accreditation for security professionals related to the assessment and management of violent behavior. Mr. Karpela is also accredited to provide consultation and training related to the European equivalent, CETAP. He holds numerous professional certifications related to violence risk assessment. Mr. Karpela’s vast experience with threat management is clearly demonstrated in cases where analysis is put into practice, how multi-disciplinary teams of professionals are coached and how to manage low to median and high-risk cases related to violent behavior.

Mr. Karpela is a graduate of U.S. Secret Service Threat Management Program, Gavin De Becker threat management academy and he has done numerous other professional training programs with the FBI Behavior Analysis Unit.

Other relevant NGO responsibilities: Subject matter expert for the European Council and O.S.C.E. in crime prevention projects. Totti is also a member of the Merrick & Company’s Global Biosafety & Biosecurity Consulting Advisory Board since 2017. President for the Association of European Threat Assessment Professionals (AETAP). He is also a senior research fellow at the Association for Counterterrorism and Security Professionals – Centre for Security Studies.

Mr. Karpela has done numerous security audits specifically related to the prevention of violence in educational facilities, health care service providers and manufacturing and production facilities. The audits have covered regions in Europe, South- and Central America as well as the Middle East and Africa.

Mr. Karpela has also authored three books on police operations with organized crime, personal security and case management guide for stalking cases. He has also authored a chapter on the use of social psychology in counter-terrorism operations as well as management guide on persistent and vexatious complainants.

The Girl Behind The Face

The Girl Behind The Face

Mui Thomas

“The remarkable story of Mui Thomas might bring a tear to your eye.” The Guardian newspaper.
Cyberbullying put all three of us where we never wanted to be: on the front pages of a newspaper.

Our family story is a real life narrative. While preparing to start a new life in Australia, Tina and I met an abandoned baby girl in a hospital playroom. Mui was then hidden away on the fringes of Hong Kong society because she was born with an appearance altering skin disease, Harlequin Ichthyosis. Tina was just twenty-six years old.
Doctors made clear to us Mui would die in infancy; the authorities insisted we acknowledge the medical prognosis; they insisted on our silence. People told us to walk away.
We fought so hard, Mui rose so high… she thrived, she inspired, we celebrated. Cyberbullying destroyed all of that. Discrimination has cut to the quick.
As parents, we doubled down. Each time, and with resilience and determination the three of us have rebuilt.

Twenty-five not entirely uneventful years later, Mui is the world’s first rugby referee and yoga teacher with Harlequin Ichthyosis! A contagious smile lights up her face.
Mui is part of the first generation of survivors in the world with Harlequin Ichthyosis.
As a family, we have grown, we have learned and we continue to celebrate, and as a family – parents and daughter, two sides of one coin – we share our story.
We speak at schools, NGOs and corporates. We are committed to making a difference.
And still, cyberbullying impacts Mui and us; it still leaves invisible scars.

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Thank you for presenting at the 2020 APATAP Conference

Oral presentation guidelines

Presentation length and time keeping

  • Please check the program to confirm the time allocated and length of your presentation
  • To ensure the program runs to time, please keep your presentation to your allocated time. Your session chair will notify you with 5 minutes, 2 minutes and 1 minute remaining. If there is time remaining at the end or your presentation the chair will direct the questions.
  • Please go to your allocated room 15 minutes prior to the start time of the session to meet with the Session Chair (their name will be noted in the program) and familiarise yourself with the room and AV technicians and setup.

Presentation Format and slide ratio

  • The presentation computers use PowerPoint with Windows operating system. If you created your presentation using another program, on a Mac or require a specific or uncommon program, we suggest you bring your laptop as a backup.
  • Please bring your presentation files to the conference on a USB (embed any content such as audio or video – do not link to external files).
  • The slide ratio for your presentation should be set to 16:9

Photocopying

  • There are no facilities for photocopying at the venue. We suggest you bring a copy of your slides and any handouts with you (if desired)

Loading your presentation

  • Please load your presentation files to the online folder by COB Friday 21 February 2020. Please name your presentation DAY-TIME-INITIAL.SURNAME e.g. TUES-1145-J.Smith
  • A speakers preparation room will be located XXXX
  • When you register at the venue you will be directed to the Speaker’s Preparation Area. An AV technician will load your presentation on to a central computer and network it to the appropriate room and session.
  • Please visit the speaker preparation room at least 2 hours before your scheduled presentation.
  • Speakers are to bring their presentation on a USB.
  • The speakers preparation area will be open at the below times;
    • TBC

During your session

  • Please be seated in the front row so that you can move to the lectern quickly at the end of the previous presentation.
  • There will be AV technicians roaming between the session rooms to trouble shoot any technical issues should they arise.
  • The length of your presentation is noted in the program. During your presentation, please keep a strict eye on the time. There will not be question time at the end of your presentation. A Q&A session will be held at the end of each session.
  • At the end of your presentation the chair will ring a bell for you to conclude immediately.  At the conclusion of the session 15 minutes has been scheduled questions and discussion.
  • We do not want to embarrass you however the session chairs have been instructed to end all presentations after the allocated time, even if you are not finished, in order to keep the program to time.

Leakage Behaviour: An Undervalued Forensic Construct

Nathan Brooks

Leakage or warning behaviour refers to the intentional or unintentional divulgence of motivation, capability, intent, or resolve to commit a violent or terrorist attack by a ‘would be’ perpetrator (Meloy & O’Toole, 2011). These expressions, most evident in interpersonal dealings, can be essential for the early detection of concerning behaviours. Leakage behaviour occurs for a variety of reasons, including, excitement, attention seeking, a sense of accumulating power, a desire to frighten or intimidate, or a sudden sense of resolve or meaning (Meloy & O’Toole, 2011). This behaviour can occur through verbal communication and deliberate or unintentional behaviour in both daily living and online activity. For example, Man Heron Monis displayed a number of observable or ‘leakage’ type behaviours prior to the attack which signalled his intent, most notably on 17 November 2014 – approximately a month prior to the attack – pledging his allegiance to ISIL on his website (State Coroner of New South Wales, 2017). While forensic risk and threat assessment tools have established risk factors that guide risk estimates and inform decision making, these instruments are only as strong as the information used for consideration. This requires not only sound clinical interviewing skills, but also competent risk and threat knowledge applicable to the presenting concern. Practitioners tasked with treating or assessing an at-risk person, must determine the threshold whereby leakage is suggestive of an overt act of violence rather than an indirect threat. This entails determining credibility, direct implications, and other associated warnings signs that may indicate a specific intention or target. The presentation will examine the importance of leakage behaviour in risk and threat assessment, exploring case examples, and providing recommendations to incorporate leakage behaviour into forensic practice.


Biography:

Nathan is a Senior Lecturer with Central Queensland University and a Consultant Forensic Psychologist working in the criminal justice sector. He has experience in both the private and public sectors, particularly working with high-risk and high-harm offenders. His areas of expertise include personality testing, crime analysis, risk management, and psychological assessment.

2020 APATAP – Guidelines for Presenters

Thank you for presenting at the 2020 APATAP Conference

Oral presentation guidelines

Presentation length and time keeping

  • Please check the program to confirm the time allocated and length of your presentation
  • To ensure the program runs to time, please keep your presentation to your allocated time. Your session chair will notify you with 5 minutes, 2 minutes and 1 minute remaining. If there is time remaining at the end or your presentation the chair will direct the questions.
  • Please go to your allocated room 15 minutes prior to the start time of the session to meet with the Session Chair (their name will be noted in the program) and familiarise yourself with the room and AV technicians and setup.

Presentation Format and slide ratio

  • The presentation computers use PowerPoint with Windows operating system. If you created your presentation using another program, on a Mac or require a specific or uncommon program, we suggest you bring your laptop as a backup.
  • Please bring your presentation files to the conference on a USB (embed any content such as audio or video – do not link to external files).
  • The slide ratio for your presentation should be set to 16:9

Photocopying

  • There are no facilities for photocopying at the venue. We suggest you bring a copy of your slides and any handouts with you (if desired)

Loading your presentation

  • Please load your presentation files to the online folder by 4pm AEDT on Friday 21 February 2020. Please name your presentation DAY-TIME-INITIAL.SURNAME e.g. TUES-1145-J.Smith
  • There will not be a speakers preparation room on site, so please ensure your presentation is uploaded prior to the conference.
  • Please bring your presentation on a USB as a back-up.

During your session

  • Please be seated in the front row so that you can move to the lectern quickly at the end of the previous presentation.
  • There will be AV technicians roaming between the session rooms to trouble shoot any technical issues should they arise.
  • The length of your presentation is noted in the program. During your presentation, please keep a strict eye on the time. There will not be question time at the end of your presentation. A Q&A session will be held at the end of each session.
  • At the end of your presentation the chair will ring a bell for you to conclude immediately.  At the conclusion of the session 15 minutes has been scheduled questions and discussion.
  • We do not want to embarrass you however the session chairs have been instructed to end all presentations after the allocated time, even if you are not finished, in order to keep the program to time.

Bridging the Gap Between Workplace Security and Workplace Culture: The Engagement-Threat Connection

Bridging the Gap Between Workplace Security and Workplace Culture:
The Engagement-Threat Connection

Melissa Muir
Human Resources Director, Seattle Municipal Court

Multidisciplinary threat assessment teams create the opportunity to push prevention forward in our organizations. With security-informed HR practices and HR-informed security practices, we can learn from each other to make our workplaces safer and prevent workplace violence.

The gap between our security and our culture reflects the natural tension between security and HR. Building bridges between them can transform our people practices into powerful tools to prevent and mitigate workplace threats. Applying hard data to soft skills, Melissa Muir demonstrates measurable ways to align our workplace culture with our workplace security.

Integrating research in HR practices with core threat management principles, Melissa demonstrates ways to foster workplace practices that increase engagement and reduce threats at every stage of the employee life cycle:
• Hiring and welcoming new employees
o How Not to Hire a Psychopath
• Setting workplace expectations, coaching, managing and rewarding performance
o The engagement-threat connection
• Employee relations
o Building connections and trust – the best defense to threats
• Ending work relationships and creating alumni relationships
o How we say goodbye matters as much as how we say hello

You’ll come away with practical tips you can use today!


Biography: 

Melissa Muir has been an HR professional in the U.S. courts for 25 years. Informed by threat assessment and management principles, Melissa is passionate about applying positive HR practices to improve the safety and health of our organizations.

Melissa is the Past President of the Northwest Chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (ATAP), a non-profit dedicated to learning and sharing knowledge to prevent targeted violence and interpersonal violence. In addition to an active role expanding online training, she serves on the national sponsorship and strategic planning committees. Melissa has recently created an ATAP Community of Practice for Human Resources.

Melissa has developed and delivered communications training across the federal government, from grammar to crisis communications. She recently introduced a program on preventing workplace harassment through building trust. She has also developed a comprehensive video series focused on preventing workplace violence. Melissa holds an MBA from the University of Washington, and a law degree with a focus on employment law and mediation from Seattle University School of Law.

Animal Protectors under threat: How speaking up for animals and the environment has become increasingly dangerous.

Animal Protectors under threatHow speaking up for animals and the environment has become increasingly dangerous.

During this presentation we will look at three people who have to deal with threats on a regular basis because they speak up for animals and the environment.

While the problems of “climate change” reach a bigger audience every day, the fact that an increasingly high number of conservationists are getting killed each year is not attracting much attention. Some of those killings were “ordered”.

What are the specific threats these people face? Can we do something to counter the threats or to make the targets less vulnerable? Can we see similarities between the cases even when they are on different continents in a completely different culture?

We will look at the contribution of different factors that include (social) media, monetary gain, big companies, unemployment, government and the tourist industry


Biography:

Alain De Preter is co-founder of ASMA vzw, a Belgian centre for violence prevention that advises victims of violence and stalking. For the past eight years he has been hired by the Belgian Justice Department to teach and advise about violence and threats towards judges and prosecutors.

He wrote two books about the prevention of violence and is a board member at AETAP.

Currently he spends a lot of time in South-East Asia and helps projects that protect wildlife and the environment.

The endurance of the Antarctic Treaty

Richard Rowe

Richard Rowe – a Tasmanian – is a former Senior Legal Adviser in the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).  During his long career with DFAT he was heavily engaged in Antarctic matters and attended many Antarctic meetings including as Head of the Australian Delegation to Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings. His latest meeting was  the most recent one held in the Czech Republic in July this year.  Richard was Chair of the Thirty-fifth ATCM which was held in Hobart in June 2012.  While in DFAT he also held senior positions overseas, including as Ambassador, in Australian Embassies, High Commissions and Missions to the United Nations. Although now retired, Richard continues to take an active interest in Polar issues, particular those relating to Antarctica.

Hawke’s Antarctic Legacy: The Madrid Protocol

Professor Donald R. Rothwell1

1ANU College of Law, Australian National University

In May 1989 Australia and France announced they would not sign the recently concluded 1988 Convention on the Regulation of Antarctic Mineral Resource Activities (CRAMRA) and would instead promote an alternate Antarctic regime based on the prohibition of mining and environmental protection. The Australian-French initiative ultimately resulted in the adoption in 1991 of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty (Madrid Protocol) which changed the course of Antarctic environmental protection, management and governance. Australia’s 1989 policy change was actively promoted by then Prime Minister Bob Hawke (1983-1991), and following his death on 16 May 2019 there have been reflections on the role Hawke played in abandoning CRAMRA, halting mining in Antarctica, and promoting the Madrid Protocol. This paper reviews the events of 1989, the impact of the Protocol upon Antarctic governance, and the ongoing significance of the Protocol in 2019, 30 years after the Australian-French initiative.

Due Diligence in Antarctic Environmental Protection

Dr Caroline Foster

Due diligence is fast-becoming an established part of international environmental law.  But what might it mean in the Antarctic setting?  In 2010 Professor Rüdiger Wolfrum (Judge of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea from 1996 to 2017) expressed the view that the environmental protection obligations requiring State control of private activity under the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty are not just obligations of due diligence but rather may be fuller obligations requiring assessment of the suitability and efficiency of the measures taken.  Almost 10 years later, it is time to revisit this question.  Is or should more than due diligence be required of States under the Environmental Protocol?  This paper addresses these questions in light of international legal developments since 2010, reviewing decisions in the International Court of Justice as well as under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.


Biography:

Dr Caroline Foster is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Auckland, New Zealand. Caroline’s most recent monograph on international environmental disputes, scheduled for publication by Oxford University Press in 2020, focusses on “interstitial rubrics” in the sense of concepts brought into play in international courts and tribunals to help define the balance of legal interests between the parties implicit in the applicable legal rules.  Her prior work  Science, Proof and Precaution in International Courts and Tribunals: Expert Evidence, Burden of Proof and Finality (Cambridge University Press, 2011) was cited by Judges Simma and Al-Khasawneh in the International Court of Justice in the Case Concerning Pulp Mills (Argentina v Uruguay).

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